Is your hometown losing anti-terrorism funding?

To trim government costs, the Homeland Security Department is no longer providing funding to 32 cities through the Urban Areas Security Initiative, writes the Wall Street Journal’s Devlin Barrett.

A DHS spokesman told Barrett that the cuts focus on cities with a lower risk level than that of larger cities, such as New York City and Washington, D.C. Cities will receive $662 million in federal funding for anti-terrorism efforts in fiscal 2011 — a $170 million decrease compared to fiscal 2010, Barrett writes.

Here’s the list of cities that won’t be receiving anti-terrorism funding through the Urban Areas Security Initiative.

  • Albany, N.Y.
  • Austin, Texas
  • Bakersfield, Calif.
  • Baton Rouge, La.
  • Bridgeport, Conn.
  • Buffalo, N.Y.
  • Columbus, Ohio
  • El Paso, Texas
  • Hartford, Conn.
  • Honolulu
  • Indianapolis
  • Jacksonville, Fla.
  • Kansas City, Mo.
  • Louisville, Ky.
  • Memphis, Tenn.
  • Milwaukee
  • Nashville, Tenn.
  • New Orleans
  • Oklahoma City
  • Omaha, Neb.
  • Oxnard, Calif.
  • Providence, R.I.
  • Richmond, Va.
  • Rochester, N.Y.
  • Sacramento, Calif.
  • Salt Lake City
  • San Antonio
  • San Juan, Puerto Rico
  • Syracuse, N.Y.
  • Toledo, Ohio
  • Tucson, Ariz.
  • Tulsa, Okla.

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