House passes $690B defense authorization bill

DOD budget must still clear Senate, White House

The House on May 26 passed a $690 billion National Defense Authorization bill to fund the military for 2012, but the bill may face a veto over provisions related to Guantanamo Bay and the alternative F-35 engine.

The bill passed by 322 votes for to 96 votes against and includes more than $111 billion in procurement funding, $171 billion for operations and maintenance, and $75 billion in research, testing and development funds.

“This year’s defense authorization bill meets the national security needs of a nation at war while preparing our warfighters for the threats of tomorrow. With the tough fiscal times facing our country, the bill treats every taxpayer dollar as precious,” Rep. Buck McKeon (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said in a statement. “Sound fiscal stewardship is essential to protecting our national security. We address the breathtaking size and scope of our national security challenges by providing for the common defense in an efficient, fiscally responsible manner.”

McKeon said the bill "mandates fiscal responsibility" and "cuts wasteful programs and redirects those savings to higher priorities. The bill makes timely and necessary investments in military equipment and weapons systems. As we work to ensure America’s strength endures in the 21st century, the bill seriously examines emerging threats from China, North Korea, Iran and in cyberspace."

The bill still must clear the Senate before it goes to President Barack Obama.

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

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Reader comments

Fri, May 27, 2011

'by providing for the common defense in an efficient, fiscally responsible manner' Yeah, right. Some of the voters may be fooled by that, but the people who actually work for DoD are not. We see all the nonsense from the inside.

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