Weiner resigns from Congress

After 20 years in politics, embattled congressman Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) resigned June 16 after political pressure from fellow politicians.

“I had hoped to be able to continue the work that the citizens of my district elected me to do — to fight for the middle class and those struggling to make it,” he said at a press conference.

“Unfortunately, the distraction that I have created has made that impossible," he added. "So today I’m announcing my resignation from Congress.”

Weiner, 46, who many believed had a chance of being the next mayor of New York City before he got caught up in a sexting scandal, focused on his middle-class roots during the statement.

His background is similar to that of many of his constituents in the 9th Congressional District, which covers parts of southern Brooklyn and south central Queens.

Weiner attended public schools in Brooklyn, his mother was a teacher, and his father went to law school on the GI Bill.

“There is no higher honor in a democracy than being sent by your neighbors to represent them in the U.S. House of Representatives,” he said. “The middle-class story of New York is my story, and I’m very proud of that.”

Twenty years ago, Weiner asked his neighbors to support his run for New York City Council, and seven years later, he ran for Congress.

During the statement, Weiner focused on the future, saying, “My colleagues can get back to work, my neighbors can choose a new representative, and most importantly, my wife and I can continue to heal from the damage I have caused.”

About the Author

Alysha Sideman is the online content producer for Washington Technology.

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