Transportation Command wants greenhouse gas tracking

The U.S. Transportation Command is asking for help in developing ways to measure the carbon footprint of its vehicles, according to a new information request.

Officials have asked for white papers from companies that can help them launch a pilot project to establish a means of reporting the information on the footprint and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To start, they intent to measure their Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles (MRAPs). They want to build an inventory of information for certain operations and movement of MRAPs, according to a June 20 request for information.


Related story:

Have feds met environmental milestones?


At the end of the pilot program, the command expects to have a GHG inventory dataset, which includes emissions numbers from the pilot project and more details on the gases being released.

Officials also want an analysis of the project with prospects for decreasing emissions, and a report on how figures were calculated, as well as approaches and assumptions for completing the GHG inventory. (Read more from the RFI.)

The project will be the starting point for developing reporting procedures and models of a GHG inventory for all of the command’s worldwide supply chain operations with its various types of vehicles, the document states.

Specifically, the command is requiring information from companies on determining the GHG reporting standards protocol. It also wants to identify key performance indicators for future reporting and analysis, and assess data quality and pinpoint any gaps in information.

Officials have set the pilot project at 60 days, with follow-up reporting allowed throughout the following year.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

Featured

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

  • Cybersecurity
    Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas  (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lora Ratliff)

    Mayorkas announces cyber 'sprints' on ransomware, ICS, workforce

    The Homeland Security secretary announced a series of focused efforts to address issues around ransomware, critical infrastructure and the agency's workforce that will all be launched in the coming weeks.

Stay Connected