DHS praises three Internet safety videos

The Homeland Security Department praised videos of mischievous college kids, troubled teenagers and talking fingers as winners of the department’s Public Service Announcement Campaign for the Stop.Think.Connect. Internet safety campaign, according to a department news release.

The three winning public service announcements came from:

  • Dakota State University.
  • Stop Child Predators nonprofit organization.
  • Microsoft.
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Howard Schmidt recognized the winners at a White House event June 27.

The Dakota State University video, produced by three students, demonstrates the potential machinations of mischievous snoopers when using unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Stop Child Predators produced a video that shows how kids can taunt one another with hurtful Facebook messages and text messages. And Microsoft made a rather silly video with talking fingers that warn of the various dangers of life on the Web. And of course, there’s plenty of Microsoft products to be seen.

Woes of Wi-Fi

Names Hurt

Microsoft’s video

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