Agencies can ask teleworkers to work during hurricanes

The benefits of the Telework Enhancement Act may come into play this summer as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts a busier than normal hurricane season along the Atlantic basin, which includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico.

In response to NOAA's predictions, Office of Personnel Management Director John Berry issued a memorandum to chief human capital officers on June 30 to remind them of policies to help feds during natural disasters and related information on telework, emergency-critical hiring, reemploying annuitants and direct-hire authority, Federal News Radio reports.

If agencies are closed during a hurricane emergency the memo said an office can ask teleworkers to continue working at their alternative worksites on any workday even if they are not labeled as emergency workers.

"One of the major benefits of telework is its ability to help maintain the continuity of government operations during emergency situations, while ensuring the safety of our employees," the memorandum said.

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