DISA's Facebook test throws a scare

The Defense Information Systems Agency created some confusion on July 7 when it posted a notice on its Facebook page that its offices were open. What could have happened that would cause anyone to think they might be closed?

Nothing, as it turned out.  After some quizzical responses from Facebook fans of the DISA page, the agency quickly clarified that it was simply testing out the site’s use for broadcasting messages to personnel.

“Sorry for any confusion, folks. This morning we demonstrated to leadership how both Facebook and Twitter can be used to provide operating status updates to the workforce (in the event of inclement weather, emergency situations, etc.),” the follow-up post read.

Laura Williams, DISA public affairs spokesperson, confirmed that the first message was a test run.

“Perhaps the ‘EXERCISE EXERCISE’ or ‘TEST TEST’ header and footer would be appropriate in such a case,” suggested DISA Facebook page user Chuck Milam.

The original message read: "The Defense Information Systems Agency is OPEN. Employees are expected to report to their worksite or begin telework on time."

Immediately after DISA posted that message, fan Jim Durham Jr. asked: "Was DISA closed this morning???" Other Facebook friends also inquired.

After DISA posted the explanation, Facebook friend Amy Barnes commented, "I bit my proverbial tongue from joking about a snow day in 90 degree heat."

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

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