NASA lays off space shuttle workers

With the space shuttle program ending after the final mission of the Atlantis, NASA is laying off workers who no longer have a function at the space agency, reports Space.com. About 6,700 NASA employees worked on the shuttle program, but many of them will now be let go, John Shannon, NASA's shuttle program officer, said in the Space.com article.

The end of the program is expected to lead to layoffs at contractors as well, according to Space.com.

 

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Reader comments

Thu, Dec 1, 2011 Arizona

Killing the shuttle program is one of our nation's most shameful acts. NASA has contributed more to our lives than any other single organization. I can only hope that we fix this in the elections next year.

Tue, Aug 23, 2011 On to the next era Wyoming

BTW - Doc Digital - I love your ideas. Let's clean up at home before we move off to other worlds. That kind of sounds like the kind of people who rent a home and live in it until it's filthy and uninhabitable and the leave to rent another place.

Tue, Aug 23, 2011 On to the next era Wyoming

TO BE CLEAR - According to the article above, NASA IS laying on shuttle workers AND is it is expecting the end of the shuttle program to lead to layoffs at contractor companies as well. Do you know something else?

Fri, Aug 19, 2011 Doc Digital

I sat enthralled with just about every spacecraft launch since Sputnik (yes, I am that old) and loved the adventure and the technology it took to do it. We have learned a lot from exploration and it has brought the world a lot of new ways to do things. Here comes the big but. But, knowing that the closest planet that MIGHT support life/species similar to what is on Earth is three hundred light years away, maybe it is time to point all that technical expertise which belongs to NASA and its contractors to solve problems here on earth. Since going to the stars will be a generational process unless we can increase the speed of spacecraft dramatically, maybe work on better and more affordable water desalinezation/purification or finding new materials that will decompose faster in landfills. We have received a lot of practical benefit from the space program over the years and this is a way to get more. Leave the space telescopes up there to keep some analysis going but focus some of the big brains back on mother earth. I can't see being able to send a group of people into space and telling them they have to procreate with enough variety to preserve healthy progeny for 300 years. Might be wierd. I have wondered for years how we might be able to turn deserets into farm land by putting organic material like peat moss and bark mulch to mix with the sand. Maybe if we found a way to take all food and organic garbage and mix it with sand to make a growing medium. I would be grdual but a step in the right direction. Just my opinion, no better or worse than anyone elses. Doc Digital

Tue, Jul 19, 2011

Unfortunately, this will be another area where the Chinese are gonna eat our lunch!

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