Comparing tablet PCs

What makes a tablet PC a good fit for government work might be quite different from what makes it an irresistible toy at home. Federal Computer Week’s sister publication, Government Computer News, recently evaluated a handful of new tablet PCs for a variety of government work-related characteristics, including security, performance and ease of use. Here are some of the highlights.

Manufacturer and product namePriceProsCons 
 

Apple's iPad 2 (Wi-Fi) 16G

$499

Simple to operate, but those used to PC-based applications will need some retraining

 

Quite fragile, but an optional Apple Smart Cover case can compensate

Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.2

$499

Multitasking powerhouse with a huge screen and full support of Flash apps

No extra security and not very rugged

Motion Computing's J3500 Tablet PC

$3,000+

Security features include biometric fingerprint scanner; rugged up to Mil-Std 810G specifications

Very expensive

Hewlett-Packard's TouchPad

$499

Powerful dual-core processor and standard security features, such as full-device encryption

Not particularly rugged

Motorola's Xoom

$799    

Runs Google’s elegant and fast Honeycomb operating system

Expensive

Research in Motion's BlackBerry PlayBook

$499

Excellent browser for Web apps; offers top-notch security when linked with your BlackBerry smart phone

Requires a companion BlackBerry device for the best — and most secure — experience

Source: Government Computer News

About the Author

John Breeden II is a freelance technology writer for GCN.

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