Like home-work boundaries? Loosecubes to the rescue.

The Telework Enhancement Act may allow telework, but what if home remote-working isn't an option, there's no federal workstation in your area and a frenzied coffee shop is out of the question?

Perhaps you need daily human interaction and prefer to keep boundaries between your work life and home life. Maybe the "co-working" concept can help.

A community marketplace for workspace or co-work named Loosecubes may be an option. It promotes a collaborative environment, allows people to interact and new spots are quickly opening up around the country and the globe, according to a recent article in Fast Company.

In existence since June 2010,  Loosecubes is in 346 cities and 47 countries.  The company's website says it benefits workers and space providers.

From $5 per day to $350 per month, teleworkers adopt unused desks and office space in small businesses, art and design studios or even home offices.  Space providers set the price and post their workstations online on the Loosecubes Marketplace, explaining the kind of workers sought. Often providers prefer teleworkers in a similiar industry. For example, startups share with developers, designers, and investors. This way, in addition to helping with the monthly rent, companies have used their “loose cubes” to connect with other professionals, the website said.

It's free for teleworkers to search and apply to a particular space. The host must then accept the reservation.

Is this the future of telework? "The new office experience should be people-centric, not company-centric," according to the company's manifesto.

About the Author

Alysha Sideman is the online content producer for Washington Technology.

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