OPM: What makes a good IT program manager

The Office of Personnel Management has completed an IT program management competency model to help agencies with workforce planning, training, development, performance management and recruitment.

The model is the result of a governmentwide study OPM started earlier this year to identify “critical competencies” for IT program management work, according to an OPM memo sent July 12 to chief human capital officers.


Related story:

IT program manager title now official


The study supports the Obama administration’s IT reform plan and the selected skills will be used to develop an official IT program management career path, John Berry, OPM director, wrote in the memo.

For example, general competencies for Grade 15 IT program managers include accountability, attention to detail, computer skills, conflict management and creative thinking. The model also lists technical competencies such as acquisition strategy, capital planning and investment assessment and change management. 

In addition, the model ranks the top 25 competencies based on importance, with integrity/honesty, decision making, interpersonal skills and teamwork earning the higher rankings. Integrity/honesty is listed as number one in terms of current and future importance.

Berry said OPM worked closely with the federal CIO Council and the Office of Management and Budget on the competency model.

OPM made the IT program manager title official in May.

About the Author

Alyah Khan is a staff writer covering IT policy.

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