Navy issues online guide to Google+

New application offers some advantages over Facebook, new guide says

Although Google+ has attracted more than 10 million users since its recent debut, many people in government are wondering what it is and how it ought to be used. Thanks to the Navy, now there is an overview of the new site.

The Navy recently published a 13-page online guide titled “What’s the deal with Google+?” on the SlideShare website, providing a basic introduction to the new social networking site and how it could be used by individuals. The Navy’s presentation had been viewed by 606 people as of Aug. 16.

One of the first questions it tackles is whether Google+ is like Facebook or something different. According to the Navy, the new site is different and offers several advantages over Facebook.


Related story: 

3 Reasons you can ignore Google+


“Why start a Google Plus account when you already have a Facebook account?” the Navy guide asked. “Well, Facebook was developed on the premise that everyone is your ‘friend,’ which isn’t how your social circles work in real life. Google Plus is built so you can intuitively break up all your connections into ‘circles’ and treat those circles separately."

The online guide also offers links to other websites explaining Google+'s purpose and suitability, a questionnaire for users to determine whether Google+ is suitable for them personally and some tips on protecting privacy when setting up and using the site.

With Google expected to release a business version of Google+ soon, the Navy said it would develop guidance on business agency use as well.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Workforce
    White House rainbow light shutterstock ID : 1130423963 By zhephotography

    White House rolls out DEIA strategy

    On Tuesday, the Biden administration issued agencies a roadmap to guide their efforts to develop strategic plans for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA), as required under a as required under a June executive order.

  • Defense
    software (whiteMocca/Shutterstock.com)

    Why DOD is so bad at buying software

    The Defense Department wants to acquire emerging technology faster and more efficiently. But will its latest attempts to streamline its processes be enough?

Stay Connected