NASA's in-house talent builds cloud

In the debate about insourcing vs. outsourcing, NASA may hold a trump card: Its in-house technology pros – albeit with some outside help -- have built a private cloud computing environment that will eventually host more than 60 percent of the space agency’s cloud applications, reports AOL Gov.

The cloud platform, named Nebula, began in 2009 to reduce costs and establish a more efficient computing platform for the agency’s scientists, according to the report by Richard Walker.

The specialized scientific applications that NASA scientists and engineers use need a more robust environment than a commercial cloud service is likely to offer, Tsengdar Lee, NASA's acting CTO for IT, said in the article.

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