House OKs funding to prevent government shutdown

The House has approved the Senate-passed stopgap measure that will fund the government through Oct. 4, ending the disagreement over disaster relief spending that threatened to shut down parts of the government when the fiscal year ends Sept. 30

The approval took place Sept. 29 during a pro forma session with only a few House members present. When the House next week reconvenes after a weeklong recess, it will vote on a longer-term continuing resolution running through Nov. 18. A meeting has been scheduled for 2 p.m. Oct. 3, according to the Office of the Clerk at the House of Representatives.

The longer-term CR would keep the government fully operational for the first seven weeks of the new fiscal year. But even with the immediate threat of a government shutdown blocked, some criticized the pace and process with which lawmakers have moved to stave off the crisis.

“While a government shutdown has been averted for the moment, these kinds of piecemeal steps serve no one well, including the men and women of the federal workforce who seek only to continue performing their missions on behalf of the public without the near-constant threat of interruption,” Colleen Kelley, president of the National Treasury Employees Union, said in a statement.

About the Author

Camille Tuutti is a former FCW staff writer who covered federal oversight and the workforce.

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Reader comments

Mon, Oct 3, 2011

Does anyone know the last time a budget was approved by 10/1? It seems that the 15 years I've been in government we haven't had an ontime budget. I usually get money in March and have to get all the actions for expending it completed by July 4th.

Fri, Sep 30, 2011

First thing to change is the order of budget and appropriation approval. Congressional pay should not be approved during any CRs and should be the last item to be approved each FY. Everywhere else (run fed gov like a business?) a budget has to be approved before the funding period starts! The next thing to do is refuse to do project planning for activities for a FY past the appropriation period or CR duration. If they want full year project planning, they would need to provide full year funding... There is no (non-political) excuse for not having the FY appropriations completed by October 1st each year.

Fri, Sep 30, 2011 Peter Nagaro Chicago, IL

This problem will never go away since those in charge of the budget are those who write the laws. Until those in Congress stop supporing those with the most money and realize that we all have a conscientious duty to help less fortunate a balanced budget will never occur. And until we replace all those in Congress who do not primarily rely on a government salary for their livelyhood with people who get paid only when there is a budget, this tug-of-budget-war will never end.

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