COMMENTARY

Remembering Harry Heisler

Harry Heisler, a longtime government IT executive, died late last month.

Heisler was a prominent figure in the contracting community, having served as vice president of marketing at GTSI, then later running the government division at Micron PC. Mark Amtower, founding partner of Amtower and Co., offered some thoughts in a brief memorial in our sister publication Washington Technology.

A lot of younger people in the government contracting market didn’t know Heisler, Amtower wrote. “But if you were around in the late 1980s through the early 2000s — the early days of selling PCs and peripherals to the government, when resellers ruled — you knew him or felt his presence.”

On a Facebook page set up in Heisler’s memory, Joanne Schwab Thiel wrote, "One of the greatest things about Harry was his ability to laugh at himself. I recall him once, with his feet up on a conference table, noticing that he had two different loafers on and laughing hysterically.”

“With his energy and intellect, Harry demanded everyone's A-game,” Worth MacMurray wrote on the page. “We worked together on the full spectrum of matters at GTSI — some positive, some not — but time with Harry was never dull and often memorable. In the best sense, he was a 'charming devil.’”

And Marci Neill, who worked for Heisler early in her career, posted this memory: “I can hear his booming voice channeling Lou Grant from the 'Mary Tyler Moore Show': 'Kid, you got spunk!....and I hate spunk!’ One of my favorite Harry quotes in response to a frustrating situation that was just not going to go my way: 'Look MarSEEa’ (which is NOT my name), ‘sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.'”

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