The 2011 Rising Star Awards: The future's so bright

Here’s the big takeaway from the 2011 Rising Star awards: Things are looking up.

Based on this year’s batch of nominations, the federal IT community is chock-full of young employees who have the energy, ability and ambition to make a difference. The 25 who won the award were not the only deserving individuals — they were simply the strongest of a very strong field. For people who are worried about the next generation of federal IT leaders, that is good cause for optimism.

But there’s more to it than that. Those individuals were in a position to win the award because their managers gave them opportunities to do meaningful work. That is something we have seen over the years: Young people who join federal agencies or their contractors often get to work on programs that are larger, more important and sometimes cooler than anything they might have touched in the private sector. How great is that?

That’s why we don’t put an age limit on nominees. The seemingly boundless opportunities in the federal government have always attracted people looking for a second career. So our criteria simply specify that nominees must be in the first third of their federal careers, which in practice translates to roughly 10 years.

I would like to thank this year’s judges for taking on the difficult task of sifting through the nominations and narrowing the field to 25. It was an intense process, but it paid off in spades, as you will see in the pages that follow.

I also would like to thank Phil Kiviat and the Bethesda, Md., chapter of the Young AFCEANs, who came up with the idea for the Rising Stars program seven years ago.

And finally, I salute the Rising Star winners of 2011. I look forward to seeing all that you will accomplish in the bright days to come.

— John S. Monroe

Read the first Rising Star profile, view the full list of winners, or read advice from the 2011 Rising Star judges.

The Fed 100

Read the profiles of all this year's winners.

Featured

  • Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump at a 2016 campaign event. Image: Shutterstock

    'Buy American' order puts procurement in the spotlight

    Some IT contractors are worried that the "buy American" executive order from President Trump could squeeze key innovators out of the market.

  • OMB chief Mick Mulvaney, shown here in as a member of Congress in 2013. (Photo credit Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

    White House taps old policies for new government makeover

    New guidance from OMB advises agencies to use shared services, GWACs and federal schedules for acquisition, and to leverage IT wherever possible in restructuring plans.

  • Shutterstock image (by Everett Historical): aerial of the Pentagon.

    What DOD's next CIO will have to deal with

    It could be months before the Defense Department has a new CIO, and he or she will face a host of organizational and operational challenges from Day One

  • USAF Gen. John Hyten

    General: Cyber Command needs new platform before NSA split

    U.S. Cyber Command should be elevated to a full combatant command as soon as possible, the head of Strategic Command told Congress, but it cannot be separated from the NSA until it has its own cyber platform.

  • Image from Shutterstock.

    DLA goes virtual

    The Defense Logistics Agency is in the midst of an ambitious campaign to eliminate its IT infrastructure and transition to using exclusively shared, hosted and virtual services.

  • Fed 100 logo

    The 2017 Federal 100

    The women and men who make up this year's Fed 100 are proof positive of what one person can make possibile in federal IT. Read on to learn more about each and every winner's accomplishments.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group