DARPA commissioning ad-hoc smart phone network

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has tapped McLean, Va.-based Science Applications International Corporation to develop a mobile ad-hoc network for smart phones, according to a Defense Department release.

DARPA’s use of mobile ad-hoc networks is nothing new and goes back as far as the 1990s. More recently the networks have been used for on-the-move communications in combat between coalition partners.

For example, in 2010 DARPA partnered with Raytheon to develop the Mobile Ad-Hoc Interoperable Network GATEway (MAINGATE) to improve the second-generation mobile ad-hoc network being used in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Under the new $8 million cost-plus-fixed-fee contract, SAIC “will provide a flexible smart phone mobile ad-hoc network, associated development and test framework to ensure successful integration and validation of content-based mobile edge networking technology developer solutions,” according to the contract announcement.

Work will take place at SAIC's McLean headquarters and is expected to be completed by June 2014.

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

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