Energy Department to establish new cyber center

The Energy Department is establishing a cybersecurity center to address the various web-based threats it encounters, according to Energy CIO Michael Locatis III.

With cybersecurity presenting a complex challenge in an environment of constantly evolving threats, the Energy Department has taken steps to improve building stronger strong cybersecurity and privacy programs, Locatis wrote in a blog post on CIO.gov.

In May, the department launched risk management approach that aligns Energy policy and regulations with federal standards. The Office of the CIO is also working with the Homeland Security Department to push forward with a robust cybersecurity strategy that continues to support Energy mission adoption, Locatis said.


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Another effort underway is the new Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center, which Locatis called “a collaborative approach to incident response and risk mitigation across [Energy] offices and entities.”

“As it develops, this network will continue to make our cyber programs stronger, leveraging the department’s best practices and capabilities and consolidating a number of disparate activities,” he said.

The department will continue to forge partnerships across the federal government and with the private industry as “these relationships serve as a strong foundation for continued improvements in our cybersecurity and privacy programs,” Locatis wrote.

“This is an exciting time as we build on this work and advance the efficient, secure transformation of information sharing and systems at the Energy Department,” he concluded.

About the Author

Camille Tuutti is a former FCW staff writer who covered federal oversight and the workforce.

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