Blogger Bob shares Super Bowl travel tips

Super Bowl fans flying to the big game may need to leave some of their tailgating gear at home, the Transportation Security Administration's Blogger Bob writes.

Forget your air horns, Blogger Bob says. The compressed air can't be carried on or checked. Ditto propane tanks and gas stoves, which frankly seem cumbersome to travel with anyway. And Blogger Bob has special warning about concealment flasks.

"We’ve seen them all. Binocular flasks, beer bellies, cell phone flasks, cane flasks, pen flasks, flip flop flasks, you name it… You may be able to sneak these into concerts and sporting events, but we’ll find them at the airport," he writes. "Please get your libations in Indianapolis if you’re not going to check them in your baggage."

TSA expects more than 40,000 football fans will make their way to Indianapolis International Airport through Super Bowl week. The day after the game will be the busiest in the airport, so Blogger Bob says travellers should arrive early and use MyTSA app to find crowd-sourced wait times. The airport will feature two additional screening lines at each concourse and will use millimeter wave machines that show a generic images of passengers instead of body scanners.

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