Chopra sees split in open government community

The ‘open government’ movement is split into at least two factions, according to Aneesh Chopra, departing White House Chief Technology Officer, in an exit interview published on Feb. 6 in The Atlantic.

Chopra, who has been CTO since 2009 spearheading open government and innovation initiatives, on Jan. 27 announced his departure, effective on Feb. 8. He is widely expected to run for lieutenant governor in Virginia.

“Remember, the quote-unquote open government community itself is dramatically variable,” Chopra said in the interview with politics correspondent Nancy Scola. “There's the open government folks who want data to create products. There's the open government folks who want to hold folks accountable. When you say, ‘the open government community,’ it depends on whose story you're talking about.”

Chopra offered more details on the perceived split in the interview, and also touched on topics including the SOPA-PIPA recent debate, smart grid initiative, how he views his advisory role and President Obama’s personal opinions about technology.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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