VA DOD joint record to be deployed from 2014 to 2017

The joint integrated Electronic Health Record system being developed by the Veterans Affairs and Defense department will be deployed nationwide from 2014 to 2017, and development work on the system will be ongoing during that period, Roger Baker, chief information officer for the VA, said on May 23.

Baker, speaking in a conference call with reporters, said there are 127 existing medical applications that need to be “addressed” in the new joint “iEHR” system. That means some forms of the existing applications would be migrated from legacy systems to the new system, or similar functionalities would be developed in the new joint system.

Although work has already started, development is likely to be continuing on most of the 127 applications during the deployment period starting in 2014, Baker said.

“The bulk of the applications won’t be in the new system” as of 2014, he said. Many of the applications will continue to run in the existing legacy systems, VA’s “VistA” and DOD’s “AHTLA” while the development work continues, he added.

During the 2014 to 2017 period, those dozens of applications will continue to be replaced and functionality developed in the new system, Baker said.

Baker also said the new joint system will have four layers, including a data map to the Healthcare Data Dictionary, an enterprise service bus for messaging between the data and the applications, the applications and a common graphical user interface.

Both the Defense and VA have agreed to build an open source ecosystem for software for their joint record, Baker said.

“We are committed to moving down that path,” Baker said. “It is not easy. It is a new way of doing things and we are breaking new ground.”

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    OPM nominee plans focus on telework, IT, retirement

    Kiran Ahuja, a veteran of the Office of Personnel Management, told lawmakers that she thinks that the lack of consistent leadership in the top position at OPM has taken a toll on the ability of the agency to complete longer term IT modernization projects.

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

Stay Connected