DOD rescinds report length limit after outcry

A day after the House Armed Services Committee chair derided the Defense Department for imposing length limits on reports to Congress, Pentagon officials have rescinded the short-lived policy.

DOD spokesman George Little on July 12 clarified the policy and said that the department’s reports to Congress would no longer be limited to 10 pages, a new policy that had angered Rep. Buck McKeon (R-Calif.) when he learned of it July 11.

“The issue that arose yesterday related to guidance that was issued last year suggesting that inside the policy directorate, inside the Office of the Secretary of Defense, that congressional reports, to the extent possible, be limited to about 10 pages. It not a hard-and-fast 10-page limit,” Little said, adding that the guidance had been “misinterpeted.”

Little emphasized there is no longer a page limit on reports, effectively immediately.

“Reports to Congress should still be concise and well-written, as well as relevant and timely. However, there is no page limit,” Little said. “Congressional reports should be as long as necessary to ensure that they fully answer the questions posed by Congress.”

McKeon had accused the White House of violating its own transparency policies and the Pentagon of purposely limiting the amount of information shared with Congress. He wrote a letter to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta demanding a response within 24 hours.

When that didn’t happen, McKeon reportedly threatened to withhold more than $8 billion in reprogramming funding requested by DOD last month, according to The Hill.

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

Featured

  • Telecommunications
    Stock photo ID: 658810513 By asharkyu

    GSA extends EIS deadline to 2023

    Agencies are getting up to three more years on existing telecom contracts before having to shift to the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions vehicle.

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image ID: 569172169 By Zenzen

    OMB looks to retrain feds to fill cyber needs

    The federal government is taking steps to fill high-demand, skills-gap positions in tech by retraining employees already working within agencies without a cyber or IT background.

  • Acquisition
    GSA Headquarters (Photo by Rena Schild/Shutterstock)

    GSA to consolidate multiple award schedules

    The General Services Administration plans to consolidate dozens of its buying schedules across product areas including IT and services to reduce duplication.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.