House passes 'red tape' bill

The House passed legislation July 26 that would bar agencies from making any significant changes to regulations before the economy improves.

The Regulatory Freeze for Jobs Act (H.R. 4078)— dubbed a "red-tape" prohibition—passed by a vote of 245 to 172.

The legislation would stop all new significant federal regulations until the national unemployment rate falls to 6 percent or below. The unemployment rate has been higher than 8 percent for 41 consecutive months. The one bill is a combination of seven bills that would either halt regulations or otherwise revamp the regulatory process.

House members approved an amendment that would expand the term “significant regulatory action” from the current threshold of a $100 million or greater cost to the economy to $50 million. 

As the legislation goes to the Senate, the Obama administration has already said it opposes the bill. Officials have even threatened a veto if it came to the White House in the version the House passed. In the administration's view, the bill would add layers of procedural burdens that interfere with the ability of agencies to carry out their statutory mandates.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.