NARA asks for input on mobile choices

National Archives and Records Administration officials have selected some services they plan to make mobile, but they want input from the public.

As part of the Digit Government Strategy, NARA wants to have its services better accessible from a smartphone, tablet or another mobile device, according to a NARAtions blog post that the General Services Administration’s reposted Aug. 28.

NARA wants to make FederalRegister.gov and Archives.gov mobile. Officials want to develop a mobile application based on the daily compilation of presidential documents. In addition, they want to make more National Archives records available through Wikipedia and through Flickr, both of which are mobile.

Secondly, NARA has proposed enabling web services, like application programming interfaces, so data is more accessible, especially for developers. Officials are considering developing an API for Online Public Access resource, the online public portal for National Archives records.

They also want to integrate Regulations.gov API into FederalRegister.gov and its API. It would provide greater access to public comments and supporting documents. It may become easier to submit comments.

Officials chose these options because of the possibility of implementing them by May 2013, according to the blog.

Now, officials want suggestions to mobilization for the future and recommendations for what would be most useful. Email [email protected].

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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