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2012 Plum Book is out

Plum Book app

In 2012, for the first time, the Plum Book is available as an app.

Job seekers take note: The 2012 United States Government Policy and Supporting Positions, or "Plum Book," is now available. The publication identifies more than 8,000 politically appointed positions within the Federal Government, and is updated and republished after each presidential election.

According to the book, the Office of Science and Technology Policy needs new associate directors for technology and for science.  (The OSTP director slot is also listed as vacant, but John P. Holdren continues to serve in that role as well as assistant to the president for science and technology.) NASA also boast a large number of open slots, mostly for career-appointed directors and chief counsel for space flight and research centers all over the country.

The Plum Book -- its nickname comes from its traditional color -- shows an increase in presidentially appointed positions since 2008 -- from 1,141 to 1,217 for those requiring Senate confirmation, and from 314 to 364 for those that don't. It also shows a drop in the Schedule C slots -- from 1,559 to 1,392 -- that give individual agencies leeway in hiring for policy-oriented roles.

Print copies (at $38 each) are already on back order, but the Plum Book is available online, and also for the first time as an app.

About the Author

Emily Cole is an editorial intern for FCW.

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