Procurement

GSA chief plans 10 strategic sourcing efforts by 2015

Dan Tangherlini GSA image

Dan Tangherlini, acting GSA Administrator

Obama administration officials are going to the janitor’s closet, the tool chest and the IT office to find the next round of savings.

The General Services Administration intends to launch 10 strategic sourcing initiatives in the next two years by targeting a range of products and services that all agencies use, such as cleaning supplies, tools and wireless devices, wrote Dan Tangherlini, GSA’s acting administrator, Jan. 10 on “The GSA Blog.”

“Everyday shoppers know that buying in bulk saves both time and money,” Tangherlini wrote, “and the government has a similar responsibility to use its buying power to get the best value for the taxpayer.” The agency’s goals are saving “hundreds of millions of dollars by delivering better value,” increasing business for small companies and boosting efforts to buy environmentally friendly products. Furthermore, officials want to make it easier for agencies to comply with spending rules, Tangherlini wrote. His announcement comes a month after the Office of Management and Budget ordered GSA to launch five strategic sourcing initiatives in fiscal 2013 and 2014.

Tangherlini said the teams that are looking for opportunities to streamline wireless and software spending are well under way. They include acquisition professionals from the Defense Department, Department of Veterans Affairs and other key agencies.

GSA has also formed two teams focused on janitorial and sanitation supplies and on maintenance, repair and operations supplies.

“In the months ahead, GSA will move forward quickly to work across government, streamline agency procurement operations and drive needed savings,” he wrote. “In today’s fiscal environment, GSA recognizes that strategic sourcing is a key way to save money and deliver better value.”

OMB’s deputy director for management, Jeffrey Zients, issued a memo in December 2012 that established the Interagency Strategic Sourcing Leadership Council and a new agency position: the strategic sourcing accountable official. Agencies often pay different prices for the same items, so the government wants to improve the sharing of such information to give officials more negotiating power with contractors.

GSA has helped agencies save nearly $300 million through several strategic sourcing contracts, which include office supplies, domestic package delivery, telecommunications expense management services and print management.

“We already know that this approach works,” Tangherlini said.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group