Workforce

100,000 feds pledge Telework Week

DLA telework week

The Defense Logistics Agency is one of many federal organizations promoting Telework Week. (DLA graphic)

Close to 100,000 federal employees will telework from home – or perhaps their favorite Wi-Fi hotspot – for at least a day during the newly rebranded Mobile Work Exchange’s Telework Week.

The third-annual global effort to encourage agencies, industry and individuals to pledge telework time has more than 106,000 participants, 90 percent of which are federal employees. This year's Telework Week runs from March 4 through March 8.

Last year’s event, also held during the first week of March, totaled 71,000 participants, evidence that telework and mobility efforts are growing within the federal ranks, said Mobile Work Exchange general manager Cindy Auten.

“I think it shows the momentum of telework, with everything going on this week,” Auten said.

By The Numbers

Some Telework Week facts:

  •   93 percent of pledges plan to use a laptop.
  •  60 percent will use a virtual private network.
  •  12 percent will use virtual desktops.

Auten said participating federal employees average “between two and three” days of remote work during Telework Week, and said post-event studies conducted by Mobile Work Exchange have shown increased productivity in 70 percent of organizations that participated. Auten said another study is planned after this year’s Telework Week, with results to be publicized at Mobile Work Exchange’s Town Hall Meeting on April 30 in Washington, D.C.

Auten said most, if not all agencies participate to some degree in Telework Week, though some, like the Departments of Agriculture and Transportation, really excel in telework.

For good reason, too: The statistical savings, both in commuting costs and environmental damage, realized are significant, according to data pulled by Mobile Work Exchange. Commuting costs alone will be cut $7.5 million during Telework Week as feds ride the couch instead of their vehicles, with the majority of work done on laptops. Individual teleworkers will save an average of $75 in fuel and 3.5 hours in commuting time.

About the Author

Frank Konkel is a former staff writer for FCW.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.