Budget

Senate votes to keep government open through September

capitol dome and bills

In a fast-moving afternoon session March 20, the U.S. Senate passed a continuing resolution to keep government funded through the current fiscal year.

The measure, technically a substitute amendment to a continuing resolution passed by the House of Representatives, contains appropriations for several government departments including Justice, Commerce, Homeland Security and Agriculture. The original House bill funded Defense, Veterans Affairs and military construction. Remaining government functions will be funded by continuing resolution at FY 2012 levels.

The bill preserves the across-the-board cuts in the Budget Control Act of 2011, known as sequestration.

An amendment to shift $55 million in USDA funds to prevent furloughs of meat and poultry inspectors passed on a voice vote. An amendment to shift some funding out of a Pentagon biofuels program and into the operations and maintenance budget failed.

The House appears poised to take up the bill quickly, while the Senate plans to pivot to a debate on a budget for 2014.

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is executive editor of FCW.

Before joining the editing team, Mazmanian was an FCW staff writer covering Congress, government-wide technology policy and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Prior to joining FCW, Mazmanian was technology correspondent for National Journal and served in a variety of editorial roles at B2B news service SmartBrief. Mazmanian has contributed reviews and articles to the Washington Post, the Washington City Paper, Newsday, New York Press, Architect Magazine and other publications.

Click here for previous articles by Mazmanian. Connect with him on Twitter at @thisismaz.


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