Budget

Senate votes to keep government open through September

capitol dome and bills

In a fast-moving afternoon session March 20, the U.S. Senate passed a continuing resolution to keep government funded through the current fiscal year.

The measure, technically a substitute amendment to a continuing resolution passed by the House of Representatives, contains appropriations for several government departments including Justice, Commerce, Homeland Security and Agriculture. The original House bill funded Defense, Veterans Affairs and military construction. Remaining government functions will be funded by continuing resolution at FY 2012 levels.

The bill preserves the across-the-board cuts in the Budget Control Act of 2011, known as sequestration.

An amendment to shift $55 million in USDA funds to prevent furloughs of meat and poultry inspectors passed on a voice vote. An amendment to shift some funding out of a Pentagon biofuels program and into the operations and maintenance budget failed.

The House appears poised to take up the bill quickly, while the Senate plans to pivot to a debate on a budget for 2014.

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is executive editor of FCW.

Before joining the editing team, Mazmanian was an FCW staff writer covering Congress, government-wide technology policy, health IT and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Prior to joining FCW, Mr. Mazmanian was technology correspondent for National Journal and served in a variety of editorial roles at B2B news service SmartBrief. Mazmanian started his career as an arts reporter and critic, and has contributed reviews and articles to the Washington Post, the Washington City Paper, Newsday, Architect magazine, and other publications. He was an editorial assistant and staff writer at the now-defunct New York Press and arts editor at the About.com online network in the 1990s, and was a weekly contributor of music and film reviews to the Washington Times from 2007 to 2014.

Click here for previous articles by Mazmanian. Connect with him on Twitter at @thisismaz.


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Reader comments

Thu, Mar 21, 2013

The sequestration is nothing more than a TAX on Federal employees. Thanks Tea Party!

Thu, Mar 21, 2013 Govt Worker 101

According to the article, even though a continuing resolution is Senate-approved, they are still enforcing the across-the-board cuts imposed by sequestration. So, in order for one group to get what they want (Spending cuts), they used sequestration as an extortion weapon? I would have less problem with that if the tactic was strictly between parties. But instead, the 'gun-to-the-head' was put against Government workers, programs and services. The 'still-happening' cuts are directly attributed to a two-party Congress trying to 'best' each other while the American public can only watch as more jobs and services are lost.

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