Leadership

Tangherlini picked to be permanent GSA administrator

Dan Tangherlini GSA image

Dan Tangherlini has led GSA as acting administrator for 13 months. (File photo)

Dan Tangherlini, who has been acting Administrator of the General Services Administration for more than a year, now may get the job permanently. On May 22, President Obama announced his intention to nominate Tangherlini for the role.

In his acting capacity, "Dan helped restore the trust of the American people in the General Services Administration by making the agency more efficient, accountable and transparent," Obama said. "I want to thank Dan for his leadership over the past year and for agreeing to continue serving in the administration."

Tangherlini, formerly assistant secretary for management and CFO at the Treasury Department, became acting GSA administrator in April 2012, after former Administrator Martha Johnson resigned. He took the helm as the agency was reeling from revelations of lavish overspending on a Las Vegas conference and instituted several reforms intended to get firmer control over the agency's financial decisions and to increase accountability.

Tangherlini's nomination is subject to Senate confirmation.

About the Author

Technology journalist Michael Hardy is a former FCW editor.

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