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ACT-IAC picks new leaders

four leaders

The new leaders of ACT-IAC. Top row: ACT Chairman Rick Holgate and IAC Chairman Jim Williams. Bottom row: ACT Executive Vice President Casey Coleman and IAC Executive Vice Chairman Dan Chenok.

ACT-IAC, the non-profit aimed at fostering IT collaboration between government and the private sector, on June 4 announced new leadership roles that will take effect July 1. ACT-IAC is comprised of two groups: the American Council for Technology and the Industry Advisory Council.

Current ACT Executive Vice President Rick Holgate, CIO of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, will take over as ACT president, while current IAC Executive Vice Chair Jim Williams, a senior vice president with Daon, will become chair. Under ACT-IAC bylaws, the second in command of each group is promoted after one year into the lead role.

General Services Administration CIO Casey Coleman was elected to succeed Holgate as ACT executive vice president, while IBM Center for the Business of Government Executive Director Dan Chenok was picked for the IAC executive vice chair. Neither selection was a surprise; Coleman's election was announced at ACT-IAC's Management of Change conference in May, and Chenok was the only candidate nominated for the IAC position.

Greg Giddens of the Veterans Affairs Department, Adam Goldberg of the Treasury Department and Don Johnson of Defense Department will join the ACT executive committee. New to the IAC executive committee are Lisa Akers of ASI Government, Brian Bonacci of Level 3 Communications, Debbie Granberry of CSC, Lisa Martin of LeapFrog Solutions and Adelaide O’Brian of IDC Government Insights.

About the Author

Reid Davenport is an FCW editorial fellow. Connect with him on Twitter: @ReidDavenport.

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