Weekend Reading

Your essential catch-up on the week's news

Weekend Reading

As you look forward to the weekend, scan this list of some our best stories from the week to catch up on any you missed.

Whistleblowing may be an old practice, but it's a new game in this technological age. Amassing vast amounts of data and distributing it rapidly is easy and cheap today. How does that change the way agencies should protect their information from people who seek to expose it? And does it shift the balance between effectiveness and transparency? Here's our report.

PlusMore analysis on the ease with which Edward Snowden spirited out the data that allowed him to expose the NSA's Prism program.

Have a senior-level vacancy you've been trying to fill for a while? The Partnership for Public Service's John Palguta explains why it's hard to do, as part of an FCW Q&A.

Think Congress isn't doing much to rein in government spending? Former GAO leader David Walker has a proposal to change things.

Around the Web: Microsoft's reversal of a policy that would have severely limited the ability of gamers to lend or sell used games with its forthcoming XBox One console, has been well covered. Wired has one take on it. It's proof that no company is too big to ignore the wishes of its customers – not even Microsoft.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

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