Procurement

GSA closes in on market-share goal

Dan Tangherlini at microphone

GSA Administrator Dan Tangherlini could meet his 17-percent goal for fiscal 2013. (File photo)

The General Services Administration is closing in on Administrator Dan Tangherlini's goal of getting 17 percent of federal procurement spending by the end of the year.

The agency had a 15 percent share at the end of June, according to Tami Riggs, assistant commissioner at GSA's Customer Accounts and Research. In the next fiscal year, she expects the target will climb. "There is no final number for FY2014, but it's going to be another aggressive target," Riggs said at a July 31 Coalition for Government Procurement event in Tysons Corner, Va.

Since taking the helm at GSA, Tangherlini has pushed for strategic sourcing--lower-priced, centralized buying programs that capitalize on the government's vast pool of potential buyers--to help GSA gain market share and increase efficiencies across agencies. He has said he wants GSA to have 15 percent to 17 percent market share among government customers by the end of fiscal 2013, with an ultimate goal of 90 percent in 10 years.

The market share numbers, Riggs told the gathering of federal contractors, are important because they are a gauge of how well GSA is doing its job. "We're confident we bring value and help achieve savings," she said.

Riggs said the GSA research -- which used other agencies' self-reports -- also showed that its contract vehicles are faster than agencies' self-drawn contracts – an average of 20 percent to 25 percent faster.

GSA's "Interact" web site, which was redesigned in May and offers targeted forums for topics such as One Acquisition Solution for  Integrated Services (OASIS), Office Supply (OS3), Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (FSSI) and others, has drawn 55,000 registered members and has "several hundred thousand visiting users," she said.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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