Workforce

DOD reduces furlough days

Chuck Hagel

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has reduced the number of furlough days for DOD employees. (File photo)

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has cut the number of days that civilian DOD employees face furlough from 11 to six. The last furlough day is expected to be less than two weeks away, on Aug. 17.

The reduced furloughs were made possible by increased flexibility provided by congressional permission to reallocate funding, and by growing budget certainty as the end of the fiscal year approaches,  Hagel said in an Aug. 6 announcement. The furloughs began July 8.

"When I announced my decision on May 14 to impose furloughs of up to 11 days on civilian employees to help close the budget gap caused by sequestration, I also said we would do everything possible to find the money to reduce furlough days for our people," Hagel said, according to a DOD release. "Thanks to the DOD's efforts to identify savings and help from Congress, we will reduce the total numbers of furlough days for DOD civilian employees from 11 to six."

The reduction comes as Pentagon departments have taken several steps to pare down costs, Hagel noted, including hiring freezes, layoffs of temporary workers and significant cuts in facilities maintenance.

The secretary also cited lower-than-expected costs in areas such as transportation in Afghanistan, aggressive action to move money and activities between agencies and departments, and the furloughs themselves as ways DOD achieved enough savings to decrease the number of mandatory days of unpaid leave. The services also have been able to resume some improvements in training and readiness, he said.

However, Hagel warned that fiscal 201 holds further peril, with DOD facing another $52 billion in cuts under the Budget Control Act.

"This represents 40 percent more than this year's sequester-mandated cuts of $37 billion," Hagel pointed out in his statement. "Facing this uncertainty, I cannot be sure what will happen next year, but I want to assure our civilian employees that we will do everything possible to avoid more furloughs."

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Thu, Aug 8, 2013

If you cut all the needless surveys, close un-manned Judge court houses, you will save billions of dollars that can be used for other more important needs like not having to loose people through furloughs and lay offs. There is a waste when a District court room sits idle sometimes for weeks, months with no court. Then you have Magistrate courts rooms that have court 1 or 2 times a week because the Magistrate Judge has to cover his area, and then spend money to travel to the next town for 1 or 2 days to cover that town. We are spending more time on the road then in the court room. Centralize the one court house to cover that area and have court there. You know that make sense and the Goverment like any other business needs to realize that.

Wed, Aug 7, 2013

Political Theater - the sequel

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group