Critical Read

Obama fails transparency promises

President Obama in the Oval Office (White House Photo)

President Obama has not lived up to his promises of transparency, report alleges. (White House photo)

What: A report authored by the Committee to Protect Journalists titled "The Obama Administration and the Press," published Oct. 10.

Why: The Committee to Protect Journalists is an independent, nonprofit organization that promotes press freedom worldwide, and its work provides snapshots of press obstructions worldwide. While it typically focuses on press freedom violations abroad, the organization set its eyes on press freedom within the U.S. for the first time in 2013, interviewing dozens of transparency advocates and journalists who cover politics and national security. The report also focuses on the implications of Obama administration policies for federal employees and contractors who share sensitive information with the press.

President Barack Obama pledged an open, transparent government upon taking office, but the report suggests he has fallen woefully short on this promise, with several journalists claiming his administration is the least transparent and most aggressive with the press since President Richard Nixon. According to the report, the White House curbs routine disclosure of information and uses its own media, often channeling the president's social media accounts, to release information and evade the press.

The report also highlights the administration's aggressive stance against journalists, government employees and contractors who divulge secrets to the media. The White House has pursued felony criminal prosecution under the Espionage Act for six federal employees and two government contractors, including former National Security Agency administrator Edward Snowden, more than double the number of such prosecutions under all prior administrations. In summary, the report alleges, government sources of information who help journalists paint objective pictures of myriad issues for the public are deterred from divulging any information and sometimes even from associating with members of the press.

Verbatim:
"In the Obama administration's Washington, government officials are increasingly afraid to talk to the press. Those suspected of discussing with reporters anything that the government has classified as secret are subject to investigation, including lie-detector tests and scrutiny of their telephone and e-mail records. An 'Insider Threat Program' being implemented in every government department requires all federal employees to help prevent unauthorized disclosures of information by monitoring the behavior of their colleagues."

Download: Report from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

About the Author

Frank Konkel is a former staff writer for FCW.

Rising Stars

Meet 21 early-career leaders who are doing great things in federal IT.

Featured

  • SEC Chairman Jay Clayton

    SEC owns up to 2016 breach

    A key database of financial information was breached in 2016, possibly in support of insider trading, said the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DOD looks to get aggressive about cloud adoption

    Defense leaders and Congress are looking to encourage more aggressive cloud policies and prod reluctant agencies to embrace experimentation and risk-taking.

  • Shutterstock / Pictofigo

    The next big thing in IT procurement

    Steve Kelman talks to the agencies that have embraced tech demos in their acquisition efforts -- and urges others in government to give it a try.

  • broken lock

    DHS bans Kaspersky from federal systems

    The Department of Homeland Security banned the Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab’s products from federal agencies in a new binding operational directive.

  • man planning layoffs

    USDA looks to cut CIOs as part of reorg

    The Department of Agriculture is looking to cut down on the number of agency CIOs in the name of efficiency and better communication across mission areas.

  • What's next for agency cyber efforts?

    Ninety days after the Trump administration's executive order, FCW sat down with agency cyber leaders to discuss what’s changing.

Reader comments

Fri, Oct 18, 2013

Obama made a lot of promises, most of which many of us knew he had no intention of keeping. As far as transparency goes, he has alwys made a big talk but done just the opposite because if everyone knew what he really was working to do, he and many of his Democrat collegues would never have been elected. It still amazes me that some people are still surprised that he has failed to meet his transparency promises. He was elected on being an unknown with all sorts false greatness attributed to him and, for most the most part, the media failed to vet him unlike any other politician in the history of this country. Why would he ever want the truth about his admistration to come out if the media will go through all sorts of hoops to make him and his mostly hidden adjenda look good?

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group