Social Media

GWAC goes social

government industry dialog

After declaring the social media portal for OASIS a success, the General Services Administration unveiled another community Tuesday, this time for Government-Wide Acquisition Contracts.

Like the OASIS portal, Alliant II and Alliant Small Business II can be found on GSA’s Interact site and is aimed at facilitating dialogue between the government and contractors.

"The Alliant community page on Interact will facilitate a transparent and open dialog around GSA’s strategy for the next version of the Alliant GWACs by collecting input and feedback from federal agency customers and current and potential Alliant industry partners,” a GSA press release said.

According to GSA statistics, the federal government has done $20 billion worth of business through Alliant IT services since it began in 2009. There are 5,800 members of the OASIS Interact page, which features a schedule of upcoming GSA training sessions, interactive posts and updates from GSA.

"Creating a feedback channel for industry and government to work in partnership with GSA in the creation of the next generation of Alliant and Alliant Small Business is critical to continuing the success of these billion-dollar programs,” Federal Acquisition Service commissioner Tom Sharpe said in a press release. “This is just the first step in a long process, but this helps lay the groundwork for a smooth transition down the road."

About the Author

Reid Davenport is a former FCW editorial fellow. Connect with him on Twitter: @ReidDavenport.

Featured

  • Workforce
    White House rainbow light shutterstock ID : 1130423963 By zhephotography

    White House rolls out DEIA strategy

    On Tuesday, the Biden administration issued agencies a roadmap to guide their efforts to develop strategic plans for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA), as required under a as required under a June executive order.

  • Defense
    software (whiteMocca/Shutterstock.com)

    Why DOD is so bad at buying software

    The Defense Department wants to acquire emerging technology faster and more efficiently. But will its latest attempts to streamline its processes be enough?

Stay Connected