Congress

Security-check oversight measure clears House

Congressional dome silhouette

A bill to strengthen government authority to investigate flawed or inadequate security clearance checks passed the House of Representatives without opposition on Jan. 14.

The measure, by Texas Republican Blake Farenthold, would allow the inspector general at the Office of Personnel Management access to a $2 billion agency revolving fund for the purposes of investigating contractors and government personnel conducting background checks. It is nearly identical to a security clearance measure the Senate passed by voice vote in October.

The Senate bill was introduced by Montana Democrat Jon Tester, chairman of the Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Efficiency and Effectiveness of Federal Programs and the Federal Workforce, after hearings revealed that the contractor USIS, which conducted a background check on former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, was under investigation for contract fraud.

"Due to the NSA scandal and the terrible tragedy at the Washington Navy Yard, we know that our nation's background-check process badly needs reform -- and now Congress has acted," Tester said in a statement after passage of the House bill. "This bipartisan bill will increase oversight and empower watchdogs to make our nation safer and our government more efficient." A Tester spokesman said the senator expects his chamber to clear the House measure for the president's signature in the next few days.

When President Barack Obama unveils changes in intelligence policy Jan. 17, he is expected to include changes to how security clearances are awarded, monitored, and maintained, according to a report in The Hill.

A review group established by Obama in the wake of the Snowden leaks recommended far-reaching changes to intelligence community practices, including changing the clearance process to include "ongoing rather than periodic" vetting, and allowing for an "administration access" clearance designation for IT personnel who don't need access to the content of intelligence material.

The five authors of the report -- former CIA deputy director Michael Morell; former counterterrorism official Richard Clarke; Cass Sunstein, former administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs; and law professors Peter Swire and Geoffrey Stone -- appeared on Jan. 14 at a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss their recommendations.

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is executive editor of FCW.

Before joining the editing team, Mazmanian was an FCW staff writer covering Congress, government-wide technology policy, health IT and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Prior to joining FCW, Mr. Mazmanian was technology correspondent for National Journal and served in a variety of editorial at B2B news service SmartBrief. Mazmanian started his career as an arts reporter and critic, and has contributed reviews and articles to the Washington Post, the Washington City Paper, Newsday, Architect magazine, and other publications. He was an editorial assistant and staff writer at the now-defunct New York Press and arts editor at the About.com online network in the 1990s, and was a weekly contributor of music and film reviews to the Washington Times from 2007 to 2014.

Click here for previous articles by Mazmanian. Connect with him on Twitter at @thisismaz.


FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.

Featured

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1986, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

  • Shutterstock image.

    Merged IT modernization bill punts on funding

    A House panel approved a new IT modernization bill that appears poised to pass, but key funding questions are left for appropriators.

  • General Frost

    Army wants cyber capability everywhere

    The Army's cyber director said cyber, electronic warfare and information operations must be integrated into warfighters' doctrine and training.

  • Rising Star 2013

    Meet the 2016 Rising Stars

    FCW honors 30 early-career leaders in federal IT.

Reader comments

Thu, Jan 16, 2014

More Beuracracy will not cover up government abuse of the Constitution.

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group