Appropriations

Cyber Command, network defenses bolstered in spending bill

Placeholder Image for Article Template

The $1 trillion omnibus appropriations bill for fiscal 2014 would more than double Defense Department spending on U.S. Cyber Command and would boost the Department of Homeland Security's funding to defend government networks.

Cyber Command would receive nearly $450 million under the legislation, a significantly higher sum than the $191 million allocated in 2013. Lawmakers also directed more than $700 million to DHS cyber defenses, including continuous diagnostic and mitigation programs.

Both provisions have strings attached. DOD officials must supply further information on Cyber Command programs, and leaders at DHS' National Protection and Programs Directorate must report on their progress on a quarterly basis beginning in April. Specifically, NPPD leaders must detail how the $719 million in cybersecurity funding is being spent and, by July 1, outline the measures being taken to secure their networks.

The budget documents also call for U.S. Special Operations Command to provide additional information about its programs and operations.

In a report accompanying the spending bill, lawmakers wrote that the House and Senate Appropriations committees look forward to working with DOD's comptroller and the commander of the Special Operations Command "to improve budget justification materials. This structure shall be the starting point and may be revised in future years based on mutually agreed upon recommendations."

The $487 billion defense budget in the omnibus bill is "virtually the same as the current level," according to a summary provided by the House Appropriations Committee, but lower than the $526 billion proposed earlier this year by the Obama administration.

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • Social network, census

    5 predictions for federal IT in 2017

    As the Trump team takes control, here's what the tech community can expect.

  • Rep. Gerald Connolly

    Connolly warns on workforce changes

    The ranking member of the House Oversight Committee's Government Operations panel warns that Congress will look to legislate changes to the federal workforce.

  • President Donald J. Trump delivers his inaugural address

    How will Trump lead on tech?

    The businessman turned reality star turned U.S. president clearly has mastered Twitter, but what will his administration mean for broader technology issues?

  • Login.gov moving ahead

    The bid to establish a single login for accessing government services is moving again on the last full day of the Obama presidency.

  • Shutterstock image (by Jirsak): customer care, relationship management, and leadership concept.

    Obama wraps up security clearance reforms

    In a last-minute executive order, President Obama institutes structural reforms to the security clearance process designed to create a more unified system across government agencies.

  • Shutterstock image: breached lock.

    What cyber can learn from counterterrorism

    The U.S. has to look at its experience in developing post-9/11 counterterrorism policies to inform efforts to formalize cybersecurity policies, says a senior official.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group