Homeland Security

DHS kicks off continuous monitoring contract

Placeholder Image for Article Template

Four companies have received task orders worth a total of $60 million from the Department of Homeland Security under the agency's $6 billion Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) contract.

The initial orders were primarily for products to provide immediate protection for network endpoints such as desktop computers and servers, said Matt Brown, vice president of homeland security and cyber solutions at Knowledge Consulting Group, one of the companies that were awarded task orders. Other products included hardware and software inventory tools and software licenses, he added.

Knowledge Consulting received $8.5 million worth of task orders. The other companies are Hewlett-Packard ($32.4 million), Northrop Grumman ($15.8 million) and Technica ($3.8 million).

"It's great to see DHS moving swiftly to get this first phase of a major government cybersecurity program underway," said Ken Karsten, vice president of federal sales at McAfee, in a statement. Several vendors included McAfee solutions in their product offerings.

The award notice came from the General Services Administration's Federal Acquisition Service, which manages the CDM contract for DHS. Last summer, the department partnered with GSA to award a multi-vendor, five-year blanket purchase agreement that aims to provide real-time CDM services to executive branch agencies, state and local entities, and the defense industrial base sector.

Brown said he expects the next set of orders to be awarded in the second quarter. Those orders will most likely be for more complex services as agencies incorporate CDM more deeply into their operations.

"Government agencies shouldn't be expected to leap from A to Z immediately," Karsten said. "With CDM, they can move progressively through thoughtfully designed steps to achieve a high-level security posture."

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


Featured

  • Workforce
    White House rainbow light shutterstock ID : 1130423963 By zhephotography

    White House rolls out DEIA strategy

    On Tuesday, the Biden administration issued agencies a roadmap to guide their efforts to develop strategic plans for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA), as required under a as required under a June executive order.

  • Defense
    software (whiteMocca/Shutterstock.com)

    Why DOD is so bad at buying software

    The Defense Department wants to acquire emerging technology faster and more efficiently. But will its latest attempts to streamline its processes be enough?

Stay Connected