Contracting

More than 100 sign OASIS deals

OASIS logo

GSA on Feb. 24 announced more than 100 contracts under the small business portion of its massive multi-billion dollar, 10-year indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity government services contract.

The GSA unveiled 123 contracts in the small business portion of the $60 billion One Acquisition Solutions for Integrated Services (OASIS) contracts. The winners of the large business contracts have not yet been announced.

"We created OASIS SB to meet the growing demand for a hybrid, government-wide acquisition vehicle that maximizes opportunities for small businesses," Tom Sharpe, federal acquisition service commissioner, said in a statement announcing the awards "We believe that the large pool of awardees will provide government with access to highly skilled small businesses through a contract that is not only cost effective, but also efficient and streamlined for easier use by federal agencies looking to purchase complex professional services.”

GSA released a 20-page list of OASIS small business awardees divided into seven pools of providers that federal users can choose from for professional services offerings, including logistic, IT, engineering, financial management and scientific trades and services. Contracting companies were allowed to apply to provide services for more than one pool, so many are included in multiple pools.

GSA has said the contracts will save the federal government more than a billion dollars per year. The Air Force gave the small business program a significant boost in December with a memorandum of understanding solidifying what had been an unofficial embrace of the OASIS contracts.

Included among the successful OASIS firms was US Falcon, the Morrisville, N.C., company that had protested the contract's request for proposals last summer.

The company's contract, along with more than a dozen other companies, according to GSA, is pending a financial responsibility determination or a pre-award accounting review. Last summer, US Falcon protested the way GSA planned to use past performance to evaluate vendors. In late August, the company said its concerns had been addressed by GSA and dropped its protest.

A separate protest of the large business contract by Aljucar, Anvil-Incus & Co. continues.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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