Cybersecurity

DHS lays out cyber framework details

cybersecurity concept

The Department of Homeland Security will make managed cybersecurity services available for all 56 U.S. state and territorial governments this week, said Phyllis Schneck, deputy undersecretary for cybersecurity.

Schneck, deputy undersecretary for cybersecurity at DHS, said in a Feb. 27 blog post that the department was set to provide the security services in conjunction with the adoption of the National Institute of Standards and Technology cybersecurity framework.

DHS will work with the Center for Internet Security Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC) to provide intrusion detection and prevention, netflow analysis and firewall monitoring to states and territories -- at no cost to the recipients, Schneck wrote.

On Feb. 12, the day the White House rolled out the final "version 1.0" framework edition, Schneck said DHS would be unveiling complementary efforts to strengthen voluntary cybersecurity programs and government incentives as it was adopted.

The managed services for states and territories is part of her agency's Critical Infrastructure Cyber Community (C3) Voluntary Program, which serves as the coordination point in the federal government to leverage and enhance existing capabilities and resources to promote adoption of the framework.

"This is just one of many steps we are taking to further our collaboration with partners across the country on this important issue," Schneck wrote in her post. "Moving forward, DHS and the MS-ISAC will seek feedback and requirements from the states and territories and tailor technical assistance and best practice documents to meet their needs."

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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