Critical Read

Collaboration is wicked hard but essential

What: "Tackling Wicked Government Problems: A Practical Guide for Developing Enterprise Leaders," edited by Jackson Nickerson and Ronald Sanders and published by the Brookings Institution.

Why: Enterprise leadership and interagency collaboration can be elusive. Bringing together leaders from different sections of the government is understandably challenging because of separate budgets, disparate objectives and reluctance to share credit.

But cybersecurity challenges demand enterprise leadership and government convergence because the vulnerabilities are widespread, said Sanders, a Booz Allen Hamilton vice president who spoke at ASTD's recent International Conference and Exposition. The study cites Hurricane Katrina, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010, terrorism and ending homelessness for veterans as other examples of problems that cannot be handled by a single government agency.

Verbatim: "Cybersecurity is one of those cases again of enterprise leadership, where you have to get multiple levels of government, multiple agencies, multiple sectors to work together."

Full report: Brookings.edu.

About the Author

Reid Davenport is an FCW editorial fellow. Connect with him on Twitter: @ReidDavenport.

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