Spreading the OASIS wealth

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The General Services Administration has awarded contracts to 74 companies under its long-awaited One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services (OASIS) program.

The Government Accountability Office cleared the way for the contracts in January when it denied an agency-level protest of the contract by Aljucar, Anvil-Incus and Co., which had argued that the terms of the OASIS request for proposals unduly restricted competition by not allowing small companies to team up to bid.

According to GSA, the multiple-award contracts provide flexible, innovative solutions for complex professional services, including program management, management consulting and financial services. Agency officials have said they expect the contracts to save the federal government more than $1 billion a year.

Among the 74 unrestricted OASIS awardees announced May 19 were Boeing, Booz Allen Hamilton, CGI Federal, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Science Applications International Corp.

GSA announced the winners of the $60 billion OASIS Small Business contract in February. In December, the Air Force gave that program a significant boost with a memorandum of understanding solidifying what had been an unofficial embrace of OASIS.

"OASIS and OASIS SB are the result of a two-year acquisition development process that involved not only the hard work and expertise of GSA's OASIS team, but also the input of our industry partners," said Tom Sharpe, commissioner of GSA's Federal Acquisition Service, in the May 19 announcement. "We know that our customers have been looking forward to these final awards, and it is clear that OASIS is already the solution of choice for many government agencies including the U.S. Air Force, which recently committed to using OASIS SB for all its professional services procurements."

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a staff writer at FCW.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.

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