Rising Stars 2014

Looking for the next class of leaders

It's been a rough several months for the agency executive ranks as critical leaders leave for the private sector or announce plans to retire. David McClure and Casey Coleman from the General Services Administration. Elizabeth McGrath and Robert Carey from the Defense Department. Bernie Mazer from the Interior Department, Simon Szykman from Commerce, Danny Werfel from the Internal Revenue Service, Joe Jordan from the Office of Federal Procurement Policy ... the list goes on and on.

One could be forgiven for wondering what's happening to the senior tiers of federal IT when even the up-and-comers (former Veterans Affairs Central Office CIO Horace Blackman comes to mind) are heading for the exit.

In reality, of course, we have little reason to worry. It's true that government service is harder and in some ways less appealing than it once was, but the missions and the pull of patriotism still draw top talent. And there are plenty of next-generation leaders (in agencies and industry alike), if one only knows where to look.

And that is where you come in. FCW is accepting nominations for the 2014 Rising Star awards, and we need help identifying the IT professionals in government and industry who are poised to take charge.

What makes a Rising Star? In many ways, it's the same criteria used for the Federal 100 -- women and men whose leadership, innovation and all-around extra effort are having an impact that goes far beyond their job descriptions. Rising Stars, however, must also be early in their federal IT careers; age does not matter, but nominees must be less than 10 years into their work in this community. We are looking for individuals who not only have done great things in the past year but are likely to play an even larger role in the years to come.

So go to FCW.com/2014risingstars to learn more.  Then let us know where to find the leaders of tomorrow -- and the rising stars of today.

About the Author

Troy K. Schneider is editor-in-chief of FCW and GCN.

Prior to joining 1105 Media in 2012, Schneider was the New America Foundation’s Director of Media & Technology, and before that was Managing Director for Electronic Publishing at the Atlantic Media Company. The founding editor of NationalJournal.com, Schneider also helped launch the political site PoliticsNow.com in the mid-1990s, and worked on the earliest online efforts of the Los Angeles Times and Newsday. He began his career in print journalism, and has written for a wide range of publications, including The New York Times, WashingtonPost.com, Slate, Politico, National Journal, Governing, and many of the other titles listed above.

Schneider is a graduate of Indiana University, where his emphases were journalism, business and religious studies.

Click here for previous articles by Schneider, or connect with him on Twitter: @troyschneider.


Rising Stars

Meet 21 early-career leaders who are doing great things in federal IT.

Featured

  • SEC Chairman Jay Clayton

    SEC owns up to 2016 breach

    A key database of financial information was breached in 2016, possibly in support of insider trading, said the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DOD looks to get aggressive about cloud adoption

    Defense leaders and Congress are looking to encourage more aggressive cloud policies and prod reluctant agencies to embrace experimentation and risk-taking.

  • Shutterstock / Pictofigo

    The next big thing in IT procurement

    Steve Kelman talks to the agencies that have embraced tech demos in their acquisition efforts -- and urges others in government to give it a try.

  • broken lock

    DHS bans Kaspersky from federal systems

    The Department of Homeland Security banned the Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab’s products from federal agencies in a new binding operational directive.

  • man planning layoffs

    USDA looks to cut CIOs as part of reorg

    The Department of Agriculture is looking to cut down on the number of agency CIOs in the name of efficiency and better communication across mission areas.

  • What's next for agency cyber efforts?

    Ninety days after the Trump administration's executive order, FCW sat down with agency cyber leaders to discuss what’s changing.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group