Health IT

VA picks Accenture for health IT modernization

Shutterstock image: medical professional interacting with a handheld, tablet computer.

The Department of Veterans Affairs wants to unify the code and interface on its homegrown health IT system. It has selected ASM Research, a division of Accenture, for a three-year, $162 million contract to modernize the Clinical Application and Enterprise Core Services of the Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture, known as VistA.

The projects are designed to improve health record interoperability and data sharing and modernize the patient record interface used by VA clinicians. ASM will provide software development, technical architecture, training and more to modernize VistA.

"The VA's ability to improve data interoperability will have a dramatic effect on the VA's provision of the quality of care, patient safety and health care outcomes," said John Fraser, ASM Research's chief operating officer, in a statement.

The award is a task order under the VA's five-year, $12 billion Transformation Twenty-One Total Technology contract vehicle.

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is executive editor of FCW.

Before joining the editing team, Mazmanian was an FCW staff writer covering Congress, government-wide technology policy, health IT and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Prior to joining FCW, Mr. Mazmanian was technology correspondent for National Journal and served in a variety of editorial at B2B news service SmartBrief. Mazmanian started his career as an arts reporter and critic, and has contributed reviews and articles to the Washington Post, the Washington City Paper, Newsday, Architect magazine, and other publications. He was an editorial assistant and staff writer at the now-defunct New York Press and arts editor at the online network in the 1990s, and was a weekly contributor of music and film reviews to the Washington Times from 2007 to 2014.

Click here for previous articles by Mazmanian. Connect with him on Twitter at @thisismaz.

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Reader comments

Thu, Jul 3, 2014 Chris Richardson Sacramento, California

This will be another social welfare project for the vendors to take information out of VISTA and put it into their own pockets and further break an integrated system by diveying it up between different vendors, rather than keeping all of the information in a local system. With 162 million dollars we could revamp the current VISTA model and still empower the people at the point of care. VISTA has saved the Government billions of dollars. It is positioned to save the government more billions. Silly decision, but typical. The VA Central Office has been trying to kill VISTA for over 25 years and still have done nothing but hobble the innovation at the point of care and stop most innovation in VISTA by standardizing it with the idea that one size should fit all.

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