Legal Affairs

Bureau of Prisons mulls eDiscovery computers for inmates

books

WHAT: An electronic discovery tool for federal inmates.

WHY: Inmates in federal prisons are entitled to have access to materials to participate in their defense, and to pursue civil litigation. Traditionally, this has meant trips to institutional law libraries, or having materials delivered to an inmate's cell. Now the Bureau of Prisons is looking to give a 21st-century refresh to the exercise of constitutional rights by inmates, with a request for information to vendors for an eDiscovery solution that meets the particular security needs of prisons.

While there isn't yet an active solicitation, the Bureau of Prisons is seeking cost information on a combined hardware-software eDiscovery system that can be used on desktop computers in common areas by inmates in general population or potentially on tablets by inmates who are housed in more restrictive units. The restrictions on the hardware for inmate use are considerable. It must squelch network communication via wireless, Bluetooth, or cable; ban access to root file and boot partitions to prevent modification at the system level or potential reprogramming by computer savvy inmates; and block access to programming tools like macros, application programming interfaces or scripts.

Because an eDiscovery machine for inmates would be shared by multiple users, the device cannot store user data between sessions, and should restart or reboot upon logout. The system would be required to support a variety of file and media types, covering anything that might be used in evidence at trial. In addition to a host of document viewers, the eDiscovery system would have to support spreadsheets, presentation software like PowerPoint, graphics, audio and video.

The BOP is seeking responses from vendors by August 7. Click here to read the full RFI.

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is executive editor of FCW.

Before joining the editing team, Mazmanian was an FCW staff writer covering Congress, government-wide technology policy and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Prior to joining FCW, Mazmanian was technology correspondent for National Journal and served in a variety of editorial roles at B2B news service SmartBrief. Mazmanian has contributed reviews and articles to the Washington Post, the Washington City Paper, Newsday, New York Press, Architect Magazine and other publications.

Click here for previous articles by Mazmanian. Connect with him on Twitter at @thisismaz.


Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.