Big Data

Urban design tool taps DOE's building database

National laboratory and university researchers have assembled a big-data tool that uses a massive Energy Department database to meld urban design with scientific analysis.

The tool is called LakeSim after the Chicago urban redevelopment project it was created to aid. According to a statement issued by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, researchers at the University of Chicago and architectural firm Skidmore, Owings and Merrill developed LakeSim to deal with problems in urban planning and assess the long-term effects the 600-acre Chicago Lakeside Development project would have on energy and transportation needs.

The tool takes into account the uncertainties of large-scale planning efforts that have complex variables. LakeSim's creators used the tool to prototype a platform that allows for the insertion of future datasets related to climate change, improved efficiency in buildings and transportation systems, and increased renewable energy and/or micro-grid applications.

Argonne said LakeSim taps building design specifications from a wide range of resources, including those of DOE and Skidmore, Owings and Merrill.

DOE maintains the massive Buildings Performance Database, which it says is the largest national dataset of its kind. Users can perform statistical analysis on an anonymized dataset related to hundreds of thousands of commercial and residential buildings. LakeSim designers can use the data on building types to experiment with various scenarios on a virtual map.

LakeSim is based on CityEngine, an interactive 3-D design system from Esri that allows users to question, analyze and interpret data that reveals relationships and trends.

"For a single building, developers have to make decisions based on varying reports from the energy developers, the economic analysts, transportation planners and others," said Charlie Catlett, LakeSim co-principal investigator, a computational scientist at Argonne and director of the Urban Center for Computation and Data, in the Argonne statement. "The challenge is [how] to do that with hundreds of buildings...in over a 20-year timeframe."

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.