Contracting

NASA rethinks contract awards under latest SEWP iteration

SEWP V

NASA is re-evaluating the dozens of contracts it awarded under its $20 billion SEWP V contracting vehicle in response to protests.

"NASA has determined that it will undertake corrective action in regards to the multiple protests received by the agency and those before the Government Accountability Office," NASA said in an email to FCW on Nov. 14.

"NASA will re-evaluate proposals as necessary. Based on the results of this re-evaluation, NASA will make new selection decisions. Until the corrective action is complete, any awarded SEWP V contracts remain suspended,” it said.

FCW sister publication Washington Technology first reported NASA's decision.

In two flights of awards on Oct. 1 and Oct. 15, NASA awarded 73 contracts across three company-size categories for hardware, software and related services under the SEWP V government wide acquisition contract. Protests started almost as soon as the contracts were announced, with 17 companies filing across various categories.

SEWP V contracts can't move forward until the protests are resolved. NASA wanted federal agencies to be able to begin using SEWP V in November, but in October it extended SEWP IV to cover orders for an additional six months, until April 2015.

SEWP spokesperson Joanne Woytek referred comment on the contract review to NASA, which oversees the contract. Protesting companies contacted by FCW also declined comment on the action.

NASA's decision to re-evaluate the SEWP V contracts now, said Alan Chvotkin, executive vice president and counsel of the Professional Services Council, is probably an effort by the agency to bump up the formal review schedule and make SEWP V available to federal customers sooner. Without the action, he said, parts of the formal protest review cycle could drag on into mid-winter, which could push a shift to SEWP V even further into the spring. 

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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