Cloud/Virtualization

DISA CIO: Don't discount 'DOD mindset' on data protection

David Bennett

DISA CIO David Bennett says better government-industry dialogue could ease "finger-pointing" on the liability issue.

More government-industry dialogue is needed for commercial cloud providers to navigate the "learning curve" on liability issues inherent in hosting Defense Department data, a top Pentagon IT official told FCW.

Cloud providers must understand that the "DOD mindset" of safeguarding data in the cloud "is not always the same as what you're going to find in the commercial space," Defense Information Systems Agency CIO David Bennett said in a Feb. 11 interview.

Hashing out the issue of legal liability will be key for a Defense Department trying to more quickly adopt commercial cloud. Acting DOD CIO Terry Halvorsen made that clear at the Pentagon’s first cloud industry day last month, saying he had heard concerns from cloud firms about the reputational damage that could come from losing DOD data.

Bennett said Pentagon officials are still trying to figure out which data they want to host in the department’s own milCloud and which data to make available for commercial hosting. More government-industry dialogue on the subject will help prevent "finger-pointing" on the liability issue, he added.

Speaking earlier on Feb. 11 at an FCW-sponsored conference, the DISA CIO also made the case that standardized IT services could help clarify who within a provider is responsible for cloud-based data.

DISA runs 11 data centers around the world that host some 2,500 applications, he said. That wide range of applications complicates Bennett’s push for standardized IT. "The problem is, every time you optimize on an application and you create a very unique instance of that application, you're going to need unique people, people who know that application in and out," which drives up costs, he said.

Virtualizing IT environments and enforcing standard architectures can cut costs, he said, but "you really have to be ruthless about determining what that environment looks like."

And he cautioned that vendors should first think through data and interoperability questions before moving to a virtual environment. Too often, Bennett said, application developers do not adequately plan for failover, data backups or other measures to guard against system failures. 

Understanding risks is paramount, Bennett told FCW, regardless of whether the system in question is physical, virtualized on-premises or in the cloud. Vendors should not assume, for example, that cybersecurity protections are baked into the cloud, he said. "We can do certain things, but we can't create miracles."

Bennett added that organizations moving data to the cloud need to ask themselves: "Are you comfortable with the risk associated with your data being exposed in that cloud environment, whether it's an on-premises cloud within the DOD fence line or it's out in the commercial space?"

About the Author

Sean Lyngaas is an FCW staff writer covering defense, cybersecurity and intelligence issues. Prior to joining FCW, he was a reporter and editor at Smart Grid Today, where he covered everything from cyber vulnerabilities in the U.S. electric grid to the national energy policies of Britain and Mexico. His reporting on a range of global issues has appeared in publications such as The Atlantic, The Economist, The Washington Diplomat and The Washington Post.

Lyngaas is an active member of the National Press Club, where he served as chairman of the Young Members Committee. He earned his M.A. in international affairs from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and his B.A. in public policy from Duke University.

Click here for previous articles by Lyngaas, or connect with him on Twitter: @snlyngaas.


Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.