Cybersecurity

Report: China has arrested alleged OPM hackers

iStockPhoto / FCW

China claims to have arrested the hackers responsible for the gargantuan theft of personal information through the Office of Personnel Management breach and is asserting that the hack was a criminal rather than a state-sponsored act.

The Washington Post reported the arrests, which have not been verified, on Dec. 2. In a glowing account earlier that day, the official Chinese press agency Xinhua reported that Chinese Minister of Public Security Guo Shengkun's Dec. 1 meeting with U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson had yielded agreements on how the world's two largest economies would fight cyber crime.

The meeting was a follow-up to the cyber accord reached when Chinese President Xi Jinping visited the White House in September.

Xinhua also reported that the OPM hack "turned out to be a criminal case rather than a state-sponsored cyberattack as the U.S. side has previously suspected."

Throughout the developing revelations of the OPM breach -- which exposed the sensitive records of some 22 million current and former feds -- lawmakers, officials and pundits have said they suspected the Chinese government was responsible. The stolen data has not appeared on black-market sites, fueling speculation that the Chinese government exfiltrated the data as an act of espionage.

But Beijing has denied those claims, and the details of the alleged hackers' arrest, which are as yet unclear, could lend credence to that denial.

The Washington Post first reported on the arrests in October but said they were in response to American leaders' demands that China do more to halt cyberattacks on U.S. companies and might have been aimed at staving off American sanctions. At the time, the hackers were not being linked to the OPM hack.

The FBI and Department of Homeland Security did not immediately respond to requests for comment, and an OPM spokesman said he could not comment on the matter.

About the Author

Zach Noble is a staff writer covering digital citizen services, workforce issues and a range of civilian federal agencies.

Before joining FCW in 2015, Noble served as assistant editor at the viral news site TheBlaze, where he wrote a mix of business, political and breaking news stories and managed weekend news coverage. He has also written for online and print publications including The Washington Free Beacon, The Santa Barbara News-Press, The Federalist and Washington Technology.

Noble is a graduate of Saint Vincent College, where he studied English, economics and mathematics.

Click here for previous articles by Noble, or connect with him on Twitter: @thezachnoble.


Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.